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Medicare Part A Benefits PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 19 August 2010 21:34

As discussed on the radio today, detailed below is important information in regard to Medicare Part A Benefits:

Medicare pays for 90 days of hospital care per "spell of illness," plus an additional lifetime reserve of 60 days. A single "spell of illness" begins when the patient is admitted to a hospital or other covered facility, and ends when the patient has gone 60 days without being readmitted to a hospital or other facility. There is no limit on the number of spells of illness. However, the patient must satisfy a deductible before Medicare begins paying for treatment. This deductible, which changes annually, is $1,100 in 2010.

 

After the deductible is satisfied, Medicare will pay for virtually all hospital charges during the first 60 days of a recipient's hospital stay, other than telephone and television expenses. What Medicare covers includes:

 

However, Medicare will not pay for treatments or procedures that it considers medically unproven or experimental.

 

If the hospital stay extends beyond 60 days, the Medicare beneficiary begins shouldering more of the cost of his or her care. From day 61 through day 90, the patient pays coinsurance of $275 a day in 2010. Beyond the 90th day, the patient begins to tap into his or her 60-day lifetime reserve. During hospital stays covered by these reserve days, beneficiaries must pay coinsurance of $550 per day in 2010. This reserve is not reset after each "spell of illness." Once it has been exhausted, the beneficiary will receive coverage for only 90 days when the next spell of illness occurs.

 

Medicare Part A also pays for stays in psychiatric hospitals, but payment is limited to a total of 190 days of inpatient psychiatric hospital services during a beneficiary's lifetime. Once you have exceeded these benefits you should speak with your psychiatric care provider to determine your best options to continue care.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 18 November 2010 20:09